Episode 11

full
Published on:

27th Mar 2023

How do I sell tickets without being annoying?

Isaac and Nessa discuss breaking down stereotypes around marketing and sales, and communicating the value of the event to potential attendees. Get more at geteventlab.com

Timestamps 

00:00 Intro

02:42 Do I have to market when I hate marketing? 

05:14 "This is what marketing should look like" 

9:00 What are you giving before asking? 

11:18 Team bandwidth around marketing 

12:36 Recap!

Key takeaways

We've been discussing how to sell conference tickets without being annoying. The key is to have a strong marketing strategy that communicates the value of the event to potential attendees. Marketing should be active and ongoing, rather than passive. By understanding the needs of your audience and communicating value effectively, you can make it easy for them to decide to attend your event.

If you want to explore even more, visit geteventlab.com and nab a free copy of the questionnaire our clients use to set strategy to their ideas.

Next episode: The season finale!



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Transcript
Isaac Watson:

How do you as a leader of a growing community, Truly make a

Isaac Watson:

conference or event that has impact, a gathering with purpose and an attendee

Isaac Watson:

experience that knocks their socks off.

Isaac Watson:

An event that leaves your audience in awe and wondering where

Isaac Watson:

you've been their whole life.

Isaac Watson:

Make it Kickass is the podcast that explores these questions by uncovering

Isaac Watson:

the strategies, tactics and tools that we use every day to bring

Isaac Watson:

our clients' conferences to life.

Isaac Watson:

I'm Isaac Watson, executive producer of Kickass Conferences, and we are

Isaac Watson:

here to help you make it kick ass.

Isaac Watson:

We are back with another episode of Make it Kickass.

Isaac Watson:

I am your co-host Isaac Watson, executive producer of Kickass

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Conferences, and joining me from the way far away location in which she is

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the illustrious iridescent, Nessa Jimenez as our operations manager.

Isaac Watson:

Hello, Nessa

Nessa Jimenez:

Hi, Isaac.

Nessa Jimenez:

Hey everybody.

Isaac Watson:

I can't help myself.

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It just, it's how it goes.

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This is, we're doing it live.

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That's what that's how we roll here.

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So we've been spending this season of our podcast focusing on those questions

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that people ask us all the time.

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And honestly, like we love answering them, which is why we're answering them here

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because they are good questions to ask.

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But usually what happens is that as you start to.

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Dig around the question and you go a little bit deeper.

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You can identify some underlying, like What are they

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really asking, kind of thing.

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And then we can get into the actual problem that's causing

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this question to come up.

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And from there we can start to uncover some solutions that can help people

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who want to organize conferences and host events for their communities

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do so more effectively, more intentionally, and with more impact.

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Without further ado, today's episode is focused on the question

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that we get asked quite often.

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How do I sell conference tickets without being annoying?

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And I get it as a person who doesn't like selling.

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Things generally.

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I also don't wanna be annoying.

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I don't think anybody wants to be annoying when they're selling.

Isaac Watson:

So let's dig into this a little bit more.

Isaac Watson:

So first, let's talk a little bit about what are they really asking

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when they ask us this question, Nessa.

Nessa Jimenez:

Absolutely, and you already alluded to it, but number one

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is do I have to do marketing, mind marketing with a capital M and big

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quotes around it because when they say marketing they're talking about that

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icky, like stereotypical marketing definition in everybody's mind.

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They also tend to be asking what do I do?

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Or what if some people don't like me marketing this event?

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Or what if people get mad at me?

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What if people start unsubscribing from my list?

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What do I do if they start unfollowing me?

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And finally is there a way that I can host and market this event

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without actually being in front of it?

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And I'll say that one specifically in our case, because we work with so many

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leaders of communities and they're not used to being the face because

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that's not really what they want to do.

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Their whole thing is about working for and with communities.

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So this idea of them now needing to lead the charge and being in front

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of the pack and getting out there and putting their face out there.

Nessa Jimenez:

It's pretty scary.

Isaac Watson:

And these are all valid questions.

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I think that it's, like I said it's worth exploring these, It's not bad

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to ask these kinds of questions.

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I the same is true of any of the other questions we've

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covered in our episodes so far.

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But it's important to dig, begin into why we're asking them in the first place and

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what's the real cause behind all of this.

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I think that one of the reasons that these questions come up is, maybe an

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organizer isn't actually confident or feeling like they've created an offer

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through their conference or event that actually fulfills their audience needs.

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We've talked about confidence a bit already this season, and I

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think that as a community leader, that's something that comes up a lot.

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There's imposter syndrome, there's making sure that you're fulfilling goals, that

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you are serving your audience, that you are leading them in a, in an effective

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manner, and it's really easy to get bogged down in this kind of confidence

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issue where you're just not quite sure that you have something that they want

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or that would be helpful for them.

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So that's, I think that's probably the first thing that comes to mind is

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just not feeling confident that you've created something that will

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actually suit your audience's needs.

Nessa Jimenez:

And re and related to that, cuz I, I have a comment that kind

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of ties in the first and the second.

Nessa Jimenez:

So the second one is people's definition of marketing is like, 'This

Nessa Jimenez:

is what marketing should look like'.

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And 99.9% of the time, it's the nasty, annoying marketing that nobody likes.

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But that kind of nasty marketing happens when people are trying to

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sell something that nobody asks for.

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Nobody needs.

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Nobody wants, this kind of infomercial type of marketing where you're trying

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to convince people that they need this thing and nobody actually needs it.

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And that becomes a problem because if that is what your idea of

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marketing is, of course you're gonna struggle to market this event.

Nessa Jimenez:

Yeah.

Isaac Watson:

And let's be honest, like marketing's gotten a bad rap

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over the years between Glen Gary, Glen Ross, and Gary V and there's two

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Gary's in the bad marketing examples.

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That's weird.

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Don't learn marketing from people named Gary.

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Just like all of.

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Typical sales tactics.

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We think of sales, we think of door to door, we think of the fuller brush, man,

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We think of use car salesman like yes, of course we don't want to do that.

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But the thing is, marketing and sales, especially within a

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community like what most of our clients are leading and within.

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The context of event marketing looks very different than this perception

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that it's always go buy tickets, because yes, that's annoying.

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If that's all you have to say about your event is please go buy tickets,

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you're not gonna sell any tickets.

Isaac Watson:

I'm sorry.

Isaac Watson:

But that's not what marketing is.

Nessa Jimenez:

Yeah.

Nessa Jimenez:

And if, and especially if you're selling the tickets based on, again,

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like what you wanna shove people's down people's throats instead of

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what they actually need right then.

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Yeah, you're gonna have a bad time.

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And that leads us, So our third, I think one of the core problems when people

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are asking this question is they think.

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Event marketing is somehow this completely different beast from the marketing

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that they're already doing in their businesses and for their communities.

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And so they get in this mindset that, oh, now I have to do this whole other

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thing, this whole other type of marketing.

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It's completely different from everything else that I'm doing.

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And that can cause stress.

Isaac Watson:

And that's the truth, is that event marketing

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is not that different.

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A lot of people get confused thinking that hosting or organizing event is

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just part of an existing product or service offering or community offering.

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And that's one of the key kind of mindset shifts is thinking about

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it as a separate entity, as a separate product in some respects.

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But the marketing principles behind it are not that different from what

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you would typically be doing to grow your community and communicate with

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them and develop that relationship.

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If you already have an audience, you probably have already

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figured all that stuff out, right?

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Like how to speak to them how to communicate with them,

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either if it's email or social media or whatever you're doing.

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So if you already have an audience, we're not asking you to have to reinvent

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the wheel and start all over again.

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It really is just presenting a new product to the same

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audience and just do it.

Nessa Jimenez:

Been doing everything else up until now don't burn everything down , try

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to do like a whole different thing.

Nessa Jimenez:

That's not necessary.

Isaac Watson:

Yeah.

Isaac Watson:

Okay.

Isaac Watson:

So let's talk about some of the solutions that we can offer.

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Some of the ways that we work with our clients to work through these

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problems and answer these questions.

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And if you've been listening for a while, you've probably heard some of these

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things before because, We'll be honest.

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A lot of this comes down to the same principles.

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First and foremost, you need to understand what are you offering

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your audience by hosting this event.

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What value what worth do you have to offer by doing this?

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If you don't understand what that is, if you don't have a good.

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Concept of how you are delivering value, either through outcome or experience

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or education to your audience, then you're not gonna know how to

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adequately communicate that to them.

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And that hurt to your marketing

Nessa Jimenez:

and what you're offering should be as a response of what

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you already know about them, right?

Nessa Jimenez:

Yes.

Nessa Jimenez:

That relationship that you already have,

Isaac Watson:

The second thing that I think about is really this communication

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process, Knowing where your audience spends their time, knowing what channels

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they want to receive communications from you through, and how they want to do that.

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Is it one sided?

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Kind of announcement based stuff.

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Is it conversational?

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Is it content oriented?

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There are many different ways that you can communicate with a, with an audience.

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So if you understand how best you can communicate with them and

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how they want to be communicated with, then you can leverage that

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to your event marketing success.

Nessa Jimenez:

and marketing strategy, the big word strategy,

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we always come back to it.

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Marketing strategy is the key.

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Understanding who that audience is understanding where they're most

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communicating with you, where they're connecting with you and getting

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into consistency like they've come.

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Affect a certain amount of content from you each week.

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And keeping that consistency in that relationship.

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And if you don't, if you really just hate doing the marketing, then

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you gotta find a marketing expert.

Nessa Jimenez:

That's just how it is.

Nessa Jimenez:

You can't just not market that.

Nessa Jimenez:

That's, We can't do that.

Isaac Watson:

Yeah.

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I think.

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One of the things that comes up a lot as we work on event labs with our

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clients is understanding the kind of capacity for marketing that an

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organization has at their disposal.

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And I say that not just in a staff and bandwidth capacity, but also in a.

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When you're talking about consistency and frequency, right?

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How are you currently marketing?

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Your business your community, your product, or your service.

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How frequent is that?

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How much space is there to be filled up?

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And we also have to think about if I'm going to be marketing an event in

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particular, how can that compliment, or how might that hinder or get in the

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way of standard marketing for the other parts of your business that need support?

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And so we think about we wanna make sure we're not Conflicting too many things.

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One example I can give you is that we were just working with a client

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a couple weeks ago who's they're working on putting on a book.

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They're, they've got a book launch that's going to I wouldn't say fully

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overlap with the event that they want to do, but the timeline around finishing,

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like bandwidth around finishing the book and then timeline around promoting

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and launching that book, does have some overlap with their event marketing.

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And so that marketing strategy that we work with them to develop

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is going to keep all of that in mind so that we're not hitting too

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many different things all at once.

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Let's do a little recap.

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The question that we've been addressing today is, how do I sell conference

Isaac Watson:

tickets without being annoying?

Isaac Watson:

And we think that when we get asked that question, what people are really

Isaac Watson:

asking is do I really have to market?

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What if people get mad at me?

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I don't wanna be annoying, I don't wanna just keep asking people to buy tickets.

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Or even, do I really need to be out here in front trying

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to sell this all the time?

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Can this just happen on the back burner?

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And the answer is no.

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It can't.

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It needs to be active.

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We can help our clients work through that by really diving into that marketing

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strategy, figuring out what what we have to offer for this event, how we

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can best communicate with the audience, understanding what their audience's needs

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are from a communication standpoint, and how we can communicate that value

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to them so that they can make a really easy decision on whether or not they

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want to attend the event or buy a ticket or whatever the case may be.

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All of that comes down to, intelligent marketing, breaking down some

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of the traditional stereotypes around what marketing and sales

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are, and then going from there.

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Thanks for listening to today's episode of Make It Kickass.

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I hope that after today's discussion, you feel more confident about talking to

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your audience and marketing your event.

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So instead of stressing out over social media content, paid ads and all of

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that, like drama of marketing life.

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Why don't you build the event that your audience will happily buy

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tickets for using the tool that we use with our clients all the time.

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And you can get a free copy of this tool at our website, geteventlab.com,

Isaac Watson:

and I hope you check it out.

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About the Podcast

Make It Kickass
Community Event Mastery
Make It Kickass explores how leaders of growing communities can make conferences with impact, gatherings with purpose, and an attendee experience that knocks their socks off. We uncover the strategies, tactics, and tools we use every day to bring our clients’ conferences to life. If you've ever wanted to host a life-changing conference, this podcast is for you.

Find us at kickassconf.com or geteventlab.com

About your host

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Isaac Watson

Isaac Watson is the founder and Executive Producer at Kickass Conferences, an event strategy and production studio based in the Pacific Northwest. Isaac helps community leaders develop and deliver transformative events for their audiences and inspire them to build a better world.

A maker and introvert at heart, when he’s not working his magic behind the scenes in event strategy and production, he’s usually at home in Vancouver, Washington working on remodeling projects, gardening, cooking, learning to sew, and building LEGO.